Paparazzi darling Kirby Delauter is the District 5 representative to the Frederick County Council. A small-town boy in every sense of the word, he must have scarcely been able to imagine his recent bottle-rocket ride to fame.

Kirby was raised in the sleepy hamlet of Thurmont in the northern part of Frederick County, where he graduated from Catoctin High School, later joining the U.S. Army. He resides there today as owner and operator of the excavation company, W.F. Delauter & Son, founded by his grandfather. His business is instrumental in fueling the ire of cynical Frednecks over possible conflicts of interest between his role in county decision-making and his involvement in the local construction trade. According to the Frederick County Government website, Delauter was elected County Commissioner in 2006—but election returns that year do not include him as a candidate. He was elected in 2010.

Local lore paints Delauter as the sidekick of self-described Good Ol Boy/Poster Child for Narcissistic Personality Disorder Blaine Young, along with a person often thought of as his BFF: Billy Shreve (pronounced Billah Shreeeeeeve). These characters are holdovers from their reign of disaster on the Board of County Commissioners from 2010 to 2014, where they generally voted as a triumvirate considered the dream team of developers, and against any and all spending. If they were to vote to drown the government in a lily pond, we suspect W.F. Delauter & Son would be immediately hired to dig the hole.

In 2014 the county was divided into constituencies in accordance with the recent formation of a charter style government, and Delauter was elected to represent District 5 on the self-evidently short-sighted slogan: Govern like a Taxpayer TODAY. This proved to be a winning strategy. Not many people in District 5 were concerned with the needs of tomorrow. Some noteworthy individuals crossed party lines before the last election to endorse Delauter’s opponent Mark Long, especially the mayors of both Myersville and Thurmont. Both gentlemen cited disagreements tied to their towns’ business interactions with Delauter’s excavation company.

Shortly after his election to represent the rural northern territory, Kirby must have surprised even himself when he fired off the tired, old, “I’m going to sue you,” threat. He took aim at a reporter for using his name in the paper without his permission. This stunt, while hardly atypical of a man who has a YouTube Channel devoted to the asinine things he says in fits of temper, achieved a certain level of notoriety. Social media fired back. With all the attention, even the national media pointed their lenses in defense of a reporter’s First Amendment freedoms.

A news story by Bethany Rodgers just prior to the election, which Delauter refers to as a “hit piece” instigated the incident. Ironically, one of the main reasons cited by local officials for choosing not to endorse Delauter was his short fuse.